Brooklyn Moving Companies

Every neighborhood, from Fort Greene to Harlem, from Bay Ridge to Sunnyside, has its own culinary style.

In a city obsessed with food (in a good way) a moving service provider in New York gets to sample it all.

Each week we are featuring a neighborhood institution that over time and experience for professional movers will become a no-brainer. The places that when you look at the day’s scheduled moving jobs, you know what you’re having for lunch before you hop in the truck.


This week’s pick! —  Mamoun’s, Manhattan.

This family-owned Middle Eastern eatery opened its Greenwich Village location on MacDougal Street in 1971, becoming the first falafel spot in New York City according to the restaurant’s website. Since then, Mamoun’s has opened four more locations, one across town on St. Mark’s Place in the East Village, two in New Jersey and one in New Haven, Connecticut.

No matter which one you visit, you’ll definitely be happy.

If you’re a first-timer, the classic, yet eternally relevant $6 falafel plate is a must-have. On a bed of crisp green salad and finely minced tabbouleh, Mamoun’s serves some of the most succulent falafels imaginable, topped with generous servings of baba ganouj and hummus.

Other options include grilled lamb shish kebob slathered in a piquant tahini sauce and wrapped in lightly toasted pita bread, also with tabbouleh and green salad. If you’re like many members on the Cool Hand team – a hard worker who often have to skip lunch – zero in on the big-enough-to-share combination plate at the bottom of the menu. For a mere $12.50, the plate consists of a hearty meat dish of choice, yellow rice, pita bread and three sizable vegetable sides. Hungry yet?

In addition to scrumptious cuisine, Mamoun’s boasts something a lot of New York City restaurants lack these days: character. Touting a straightforward sense of compassion, one can always count on being greeted with a smile and a sincere “how’re-you-doing” when walking into a Mamoun’s.

A Village Voice reporter even saw something poignantly political in Mamoun’s restaurant when he in 1976 encouraged Secretary of State Henry Kissinger to visit the nascent falafel spot.

“Kissinger could take a lesson in diplomacy here,” the reporter wrote. “Mamoun’s has Arabs and Jews eating at the same table.”

Mamoun’s Falafel is one of those places.

 

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This week’s featured member of the Cool Hand team is Samuel Berglund.
Sam moved to Brooklyn from his native land of Sweden in 2014 and following  his passion for sailing, he is pursuing a career running boat tours.
Getting a captain’s license take time! So we’ve been lucky enough to have Sam on board and it will be sad to see him go!    

When did you start working for Cool Hand, and what drew you to the position?

I started this summer. My wife told me about some really cool friends of her that were looking for help.

What was your first impression once you started working? Did anything surprise you?

I’m not going to lie, I expected it to be a group of disgruntled old men. But it turned out to be a fun group of people from different walks of life, with different view and experiences that they bring in to the day to day work.

What do you enjoy most about working in the NYC moving industry, and with Cool Hand in particular?

Working as a mover in New York is an experience that is hard to find anywhere else. Everything from places you get to see to people you get to meet. And the constant hustle to just move around in New York makes everyday different from the next.

What is your favorite place to eat in the city that you’ve discovered white out on moving jobs?

I am a big fan of New York pizza, and so far i haven’t found a bad pizza place.

You are originally from Sweden. What advice would you give to someone moving to NYC and looking for moving help in New York?

Well first of all call Cool Hand Movers ;). And second, don’t freak out from all the constant hustle that surrounds a move. New Yorkers are always helpful and even if it might seem impossible you’ll always make it with the New Yorkers around you.

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Every neighborhood, from Fort Greene to Harlem, from Bay Ridge to Sunnyside, has its own culinary style.

In a city obsessed with food (in a good way) local movers in NYC get to sample it all.

Each week we are featuring a neighborhood institution that over time and experience or professional packers  will become a no-brainer. The places that when you look at the day’s scheduled moving jobs, you know what you’re having for lunch before you hop in the truck.


This week’s pick! —  A&A Bake and Doubles Shop, Bedstuy 

Located near the corner of Nostrand Avenue and Fulton Street in Brooklyn, A&A Bake and Doubles Shop has been cooking up traditional Trinidadian street food for nearly 15 years. The Caribbean bakery is most famous for its namesake “doubles,” a quintessentially Trinidadian morning meal of fried flat bread stuffed with a savory chickpea mash known as “Channa.”

A&A has become a mainstay for the neighborhood’s sprawling Caribbean community while also attracting customers from across the city and receiving well-deserved praise from prominent newspapers and food blogs.

Non-dependent on the weather or the weekday, a line begins to form at the break of dawn outside the family-owned bakery’s unassuming storefront. When a Cool Hand team member who lives in the area stopped by for a couple of doubles on a recent Tuesday morning, the line already stretched half a block. But he didn’t fret, knowing that doubles from A&A are worth the wait.

For a meager $1.50 apiece, doubles are made-to-order and spiced with tamarind chutney and hot pepper sauce (make sure to skip the hot pepper if you’re not a fan of fiery flavors). The filling breakfast snack can be a bit tricky to eat but don’t worry: you’ll get the hang of it after a couple of times.

Staying true to its Trinidad and Tobago roots, A&A’s other dishes are dominated by heavily seasoned seafood. The $3.50 fry bake – a chunky biscuit stuffed with smoked herring, salmon, salted fish, shark or shrimp – is an explosive culinary delight preferably paired with a refreshing Trinidadian soda. The $5 sada bake comes with the same seafood options but is served on a thin pita-like slice of bread.

From open to close, the bakery booms with Trinidadian saco music and the workers behind the counter chat with locals in Creole. The atmosphere is warm and friendly; the food is delicious and almost incomprehensibly affordable – what are you waiting for?

 

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