Every neighborhood, from Fort Greene to Harlem, from Bay Ridge to Sunnyside, has its own culinary style.

In a city obsessed with food (in a good way) Packers and Movers get to sample it all.

Each week we are featuring a neighborhood institution that over time and experience or professional packers and Movers Services  will become a no-brainer. The places that when you look at the day’s scheduled moving jobs, you know what you’re having for lunch before you hop in the truck.


This week’s pick! —  A&A Bake and Doubles Shop, Bedstuy 

Located near the corner of Nostrand Avenue and Fulton Street in Brooklyn, A&A Bake and Doubles Shop has been cooking up traditional Trinidadian street food for nearly 15 years. The Caribbean bakery is most famous for its namesake “doubles,” a quintessentially Trinidadian morning meal of fried flat bread stuffed with a savory chickpea mash known as “Channa.”

A&A has become a mainstay for the neighborhood’s sprawling Caribbean community while also attracting customers from across the city and receiving well-deserved praise from prominent newspapers and food blogs.

Non-dependent on the weather or the weekday, a line begins to form at the break of dawn outside the family-owned bakery’s unassuming storefront. When a Cool Hand team member who lives in the area stopped by for a couple of doubles on a recent Tuesday morning, the line already stretched half a block. But he didn’t fret, knowing that doubles from A&A are worth the wait.

For a meager $1.50 apiece, doubles are made-to-order and spiced with tamarind chutney and hot pepper sauce (make sure to skip the hot pepper if you’re not a fan of fiery flavors). The filling breakfast snack can be a bit tricky to eat but don’t worry: you’ll get the hang of it after a couple of times.

Staying true to its Trinidad and Tobago roots, A&A’s other dishes are dominated by heavily seasoned seafood. The $3.50 fry bake – a chunky biscuit stuffed with smoked herring, salmon, salted fish, shark or shrimp – is an explosive culinary delight preferably paired with a refreshing Trinidadian soda. The $5 sada bake comes with the same seafood options but is served on a thin pita-like slice of bread.

From open to close, the bakery booms with Trinidadian saco music and the workers behind the counter chat with locals in Creole. The atmosphere is warm and friendly; the food is delicious and almost incomprehensibly affordable – what are you waiting for?

This week’s featured member of the Cool Hand team is Larvelle Bell.
A full-time Cool Hand Mover, Larvelle plays a key role in making sure that each job runs smoothly. Previously employed in the art handling industry, he has a knack for detail which comes in handy on high-end jobs with extremely delicate and valuable cargo.

When did you start working for Cool Hand, and what drew you to the position?

Earlier this year I began working on the team just for weekends while I held my other job. Then in August, I was offered the full-time position and I went for it. What drew me in the most was that I like the work-out and the team. 

What was your first impression once you started working? Did anything surprise you?

It was a cool group of people that I was working with, easier than my last job in that way.

What do you enjoy most about working in the NYC moving industry, and with Cool Hand in particular?

I like the travel, getting around the city and sometimes outside the city. And I like to meet new clients.

What do you like to do with your time when you’re off the clock?

Spend time with my daughter.

moving companies brooklyn;

What’s for lunch? Local movers NYC food guide

Every neighborhood, from Fort Greene to Harlem, from Bay Ridge to Sunnyside, has its own culinary style.

In a city obsessed with food (in a good way) local movers NYC get to sample it all.

Each week we are featuring a neighborhood institution that over time and experience or professional packers  will become a no-brainer. The places that when you look at the day’s scheduled moving jobs, you know what you’re having for lunch before you hop in the truck.


This week’s pick! —  Little MO, Bushwick 

As movers in New York City, members on the Cool Hand team are used to quick lunches that are easy to eat in the truck. But every now and then, our movers get an odd hour off between jobs and usually like to kill that time over an energizing meal.

That’s how we found Little MO.

The exquisite Vietnamese eatery, located just a block from Brooklyn’s busy Myrtle and Broadway intersection, offers takeout but should – for pho’s sake – be enjoyed onsite, as many dishes require a fair amount of dexterity.

Every day of the week between noon and 11 p.m., customers pile into Little MO’s refurbished industrial locale to enjoy steaming pho noodle soups, rice bowls and banh mi sandwiches. Little MO is a sit-down eatery but the menu is thankfully far from exorbitant.

For $10, you get a lip-smacking bowl of “Classic Pho” – thin rice noodles steeped in a hearty beef and oxtail broth topped with chunks of grilled ribeye steak, beef meatballs and tripe. Unless you’re wary of spice, the noodle soup is preferably matched with Sriracha sauce or Little MO’s homemade chili paste.  The rice bowls and banh mis span between $10 and $13 and contain all the essentials, plus a couple of welcome surprises. How about a Cajun fried catfish banh mi or a rice bowl with bulgogi-marinated ribeye steak, provolone cheese and kimchi?

Little MO also offers great vegetarian options. The “Vegan Pho” is a delicious and refreshing addition to an otherwise meat-dominated menu and the “Little Bao”  (steamed buns with pickled cucumber, cilantro and ground peanuts) is a perfect afternoon snack.

A Cool Hand mover recently worked in the neighborhood and had been craving a braised pork belly banh mi all day when he was stunned to find out that Little MO had temporarily closed down in light of crippling repairs on the nearby M train station. “Little MO will reopen on November 6th,” read a note posted on the front door. “We know you’ve missed us and we miss you too!”

Spot on, Little MO staff. November 6th can’t come soon enough.

 

Local movers NYC